Learn Our History

1950's

50 YEARS OF MOKE


At the end of the 1950s, the British Army asked the British Motor Corporation (BMC) to design a new, light, parachute-droppable, military vehicle. Alec Issigonis, the father of the Mini, couldn’t have imagined then that his little Moke would become the iconic, must-have car around the world.

50 YEARS OF MOKE
1959

THE BUCKBOARD


Before working on the Mini, Alec Issigonis designed several military vehicles, mainly during WWII. At the end of the 1950s, the British Army sought a lightweight, air-transportable, utility vehicle, and soon a prototype was created. The BMC’s interpretation was a vehicle codenamed “Buckboard,” built under Issigonis’s supervision. Presented to the Queen’s troops in 1959, the prototype failed to pass inspection due to its low ground clearance and weak engine. However, the Royal Navy showed interest in the vehicle for use on the decks of its aircraft carriers.

THE BUCKBOARD
1962

THE MILITARY MINI MOKE


Undaunted, the BMC made adjustments to the original design and introduced the Mini Moke in 1962. The vehicle boasted larger tires, better off-road capabilities improved suspension and true 4x4 driving with an 848cc engine. Military officials remained unimpressed with the second iteration, and thus to recoup development costs, the BMC decided to commercialize a civilian version of The More. The new vehicle debuted in January 1964.

THE MILITARY MINI MOKE
1964

THE AUSTIN MINI MOKE


Based on the original Make, but without doors and many optional extras, the Austin Mini More was marketed in the UK as a utilitarian vehicle. Despite its appearance in the British TV series “The Prisoner,” the Austin Mini More only soled 10% of its 14,500 units and production ceased four years later.

THE AUSTIN MINI MOKE
1966

THE MORRIS MINI MOKE


In 1966 in Australia, a new version of the More was assembled. Called the Morris Mini More, the car was fitted with 13-inch wheels (larger than the 10-inch British version) and a bigger 998cc engine, which allowed it to reach a top speed of 80 miles/hr.

THE MORRIS MINI MOKE
1973

THE MOKE CALIFORNIAN


Starting in 1973, the Morris Mini Mmoe was sold as the Leyland Moke. By 1976, the vehicle had been fitted with a new 1098 cc motor, later upgraded to a more powerful 1275cc engine. Dubbed the Moke Californian, the latest iteration was in production until 1981, reaching cult status for generations of sun-seekers and jet-setters.

THE MOKE CALIFORNIAN
1993

MOKE CEASES PRODUCTION


From 1980-1993, the BMC’s Portuguese subsidiary manufactured the Moke. While production ceased, nostalgia remained, making the Moke a favorite memory from sunny destinations across the world.

MOKE CEASES PRODUCTION
2016

THE MOKE IS REBORN


20 years later, Moke International brings back the iconic vehicle. Internationally recognized British Designer Michael Young completely redesigned and re-engineered the More for the 21st century. The new model remains faithful to its heritage while integrating the most pertinent elements of today’s automotive technology for this generation’s enthusiasts and next generation’s drivers.

THE MOKE IS REBORN